Legal Property

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Thursday, July 26, 2012

Author Interview - Kathi Macias, Author of Special Delivery


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Anne: Good morning, Kathi. You write books that give me that nudge to be more aware of how much God requires of us. Following where he leads is not always easy, pleasant, or painless. And in the Freedom Series pain, both real and psychological, afflicts the heroine, Mara.  What awakened you to the need for this series?

Kathi: I must confess that it was actually my publisher (New Hope) who suggested I consider doing a fiction series on human trafficking, specifically child sex slavery. I knew such a thing existed, of course, and I was appalled by it, but I had no idea until I began researching it how very prevalent and horrific it is. Once I grasped the scope of this crime—the second largest illegal industry in the world, bringing in some $32 billion dollars annually—I knew I needed to write the series.

Anne: I'm glad New Hope encouraged you to write this. I asked a local law enforcement friend here if he knew of any sex slavery or human trafficking here, and he said no. But he said the vicious illegal marijuana growers in the area could be using slave labor to grow their crops. I know the "gardens" in the Forest are dangerous places. Are you ever a little concerned about repercussions from this sexual slavery organization?
Kathi: Because this is organized crime and extremely lucrative, that’s always a possibility, of course. I had some of the same concerns when I wrote People of the Book, dealing with honor killings. But when we believe God has called us to do something, we really can’t shy away from it for fear of what might happen.
Anne: Have you seen an impact on people from this series?
Kathi: Though people occasionally tell me they just couldn’t bring themselves to read the books once they realized the subject matter, most have thanked me for writing it and for bringing this issue to light in such a way that readers are called to respond. One pastor’s wife wrote to tell me she read the book and passed it on to her husband. When he finished it, they made a commitment to get their church involved any way they can. Many have invited me to come and speak to their churches, women’s groups, missions conferences, etc., and I’m more than happy to do so.
Anne: Writing of such suffering must be stressful. What was the deepest hurt you experienced from this writing?
Kathi: This is a difficult subject, and there were times when I was researching and writing that I had to get up and walk away from the computer—go outside and get some fresh air and sunshine. The books are fiction, of course, but knowing how close they are to truth, I really struggled with that.
Anne: Was there also a compensating joy?
Kathi: Each time I felt the darkness of the subject matter was about to overwhelm me, I reminded myself that I’m not writing about the darkness; I’m writing about the Light that shines in the darkness. These books are a call to the church to heed the scriptural admonition to “rescue the perishing.” That God allows me to partner with Him in that call is a great joy indeed!

Anne: Thanks for spending some time with us here today, my friend. If even one of the people reading this today takes some step against these ugly crimes against children, we could make a difference. If only one child could be freed, if only one trafficker could be stopped--If only.

You might think it couldn't happen to you, but I wouldn't be surprised if you know someone it did happen to. The only other baby born at the hospital on the day my older son was born--six years later she was kidnapped and raped and killed. One of my school friends--her granddaughter disappeared and that's probably what happened to her. A child from my daughter's kindergarten school, too.

 Please, folks. It could be one of your own children or grandchildren next. Ask your local law inforcement.