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Thursday, October 31, 2013

Book Review--SOLDIER'S HEART by Tamera Lynn Kraft


Murray Pura's American Civil War Series - Cry of Freedom - Volume 13 - Soldier's Heart By: Murray Pura,Tamera Lynn Kraft


Did it occur to you that Post Traumatic Stress Disorder afflicted Civil War soldiers, too? Except that they didn't know it by PTSD--they called it "Soldier's Heart."


Tamara Lynn Kraft has woven a heart-grabbing story of a young man returned from the war. Noah wants to take care of the bride he was forced to leave the day after they were wed, to let her know by his caring how much he loves her.

The problem is that the recurring nightmares and sometimes hallucinations make Molly fear him. The last thing he would ever do is deliberately hurt her, but when he grabs her to "save" her from imaginary enemies, he leaves bruises.

His best friend and his pastor work to save him from his Soldier's Heart and save their marriage, but he is so afraid he might hurt her again. Would it be better to leave? He is torn. He loves her, but if he can't stop this crazy thinking he might have to leave.

Soldier's Heart by Tamara Lynn Kraft is Volume 13 in Murray Pura's American Civil War Series, Cry of Freedom. It can be purchased from Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and Kobo. I highly recommend this book. And, by the way, Tamara is offering a free book to one commenter on the blog. Be sure to leave your email so we have a way to scontact you, and be sure to leave it on or before November 7, 2013!

4 comments:

  1. It has been called many things over the years, but the results have always been the same; the sadness, at times overwhelming, the fear at night, the inability to reconnected in loving ways with loved ones, and mostly, the spirit in which the soldier accepted his duty as a soldier and simply did that which he could to save his piece of the world as he knew it at the time. One of my brother's paid dearly for his part; with Agent Orange left in his system, and w eventual kidney transplants, and 56 pills a day to stay alive. But he, along with my father,taught me a great lesson; that to waken and have the opportunity to take another breath in this life, on this earth was a precious thing, and that honor and integrity counted far more than labels on clothes daddy and Bobby, for the greatest of al gifts.

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    1. Thank you for sharing this heart wrenching story about your brother's service to his country. DJ.

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  2. Thanks, DJ. That is a heartrending story, and repeated way too many times in the returning soldiers. My heart aches for your brother and for others with this affliction. At the time, I offer my gratitude and admiration to those who risk their lives for their country and families. God bless you.
    ~Anne

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  3. Thank you, Anne, for your wonderful review.

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